Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

Within three years, deep learning will change front-end development. It will increase prototyping speed and lower the barrier for building software.

The field took off last year when Tony Beltramelli introduced the pix2code paper and Airbnb launched sketch2code.

Photo by Wesson Wang on Unsplash

Currently, the largest barrier to automating front-end development is computing power. However, we can use current deep learning algorithms, along with synthesized training data, to start exploring artificial front-end automation right now.

In this post, we’ll teach a neural network how to code a basic a HTML and CSS website…


Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

Earlier this year, Amir Avni used neural networks to troll the subreddit/r/Colorization — a community where people colorize historical black and white images manually using Photoshop.

They were astonished with Amir’s deep learning bot. What could take up to a month of manual labour could now be done in just a few seconds.

I was fascinated by Amir’s neural network, so I reproduced it and documented the process. First off, let’s look at some of the results/failures from my experiments (scroll to the bottom for the final result).

The original b&w images are from Unsplash


Source: Google press image for Deep Mind

Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

In this article, we’ll explore six snippets of code that made deep learning what it is today. We’ll cover the inventors and the background to their breakthroughs. Each story includes simple code samples on FloydHub and GitHub to play around with.

If this is your first encounter with deep learning, I’d suggest reading my Deep Learning 101 for Developers.

To run the code examples on FloydHub, install the floydcommand line tool. Then clone the code examples I’ve provided to your local machine.

Note: If you are new to…


The current wave of deep learning took off five years ago. Exponential progress in computing power followed by a few success stories created the hype.

Deep learning is the technology that drives cars, beats humans at Atari games, and diagnoses cancer.

Photo by Arif Wahid on Unsplash

When I started learning deep learning I spent two weeks researching. I selected tools, compared cloud services, and researched online courses. In retrospect, I wish I could have built neural networks from day one. That’s what this article is set out to do.

You don’t need any prerequisites. …


Illustration by Rozalina Burkova

Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

Learning is a by-product. It’s a result of an activity that you didn’t consider learning in the first place.

When I think: Good learners. What comes to mind are children below the age of six, entrepreneurs, new parents and world-class performers. These are people that are not ‘learning’ through the classic school model. Instead, we call teenagers in school that are bored to death: Learners. When in reality, they are learning the least.


Illustration by Rozalina Burkova

Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

We all acquire knowledge in a similar way. We don’t have different learning styles, right/left brain advantages, photographic memories; nor speed reading advantages, or brain development inappropriateness. If you are eight years old you could be programming organs in RNA. You just need to master the prerequisites. [1]

One of the most effective approaches to acquiring knowledge is teaching. This is how Richard Feynman acquired knowledge. He selected a concept then taught it to an imaginary person. He spoke, wrote, and drew the concept to his ‘student’. When…


Illustration by Rozalina Burkova

Note: I’ve moved all my writing to Substack, please follow me there.

Learning is when you use something from your memory. It’s not when you read a non-fiction book, attend a lecture, or watch a documentary. It’s when you use knowledge.

Your working memory encodes and consolidates new knowledge. Then it stores the new knowledge for a brief moment. It’s not until you use that information from working memory that you transfer it into your long-term memory. That’s when you are learning. [1]

Re-reading a book is not just a waste of time. You deceive yourself because you don’t improve…

Emil Wallner

Internet-educated, indie researcher, and in residency at Google Arts & Culture

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store